Shows / Expositions  | Projects / projets  | La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Bruxelles  | Méthode Room, Chicago  | Workshop / Ateliers  | Texts / Textes  | Interviews / Entretiens  | INFO




>> La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Bruxelles

JACQUELINE MESMAEKER
La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2019



From February 1st, to March 30, 2019

ENGLISH

JACQUELINE MESMAEKER

EXHIBITION FROM FEBRUARY 1st TO MARCH 30, 2019

OPENING THURSDAY JANUARY 31, 2019, FROM 6 P.M. TO 9 P.M.

LA VERRIÈRE, BRUXELLES
50, BOULEVARD DE WATERLOO
FROM TUESDAY TO SATURDAY, 12 A.M.-6 P.M.
FREE ADMISSION

Jacqueline Mesmaeker, exhibition view, La Verrière, Brussels, 2019
Courtesy of the artist © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès

A themed series of exhibitions is a journey, an adventure we embark upon with no clear idea of where it will lead us in the end. When I launched ‘Ballistic Poetry’ in 2016, I did so under the aegis of Marcel Broodthaers ; in other words, in the name of conceptual art that retains a sense of poetry, the irreductible creative force that eludes the rigour and logic of programmatic forms. Now, as the season draws to a close, like a snake coiling in upon itself, we return after much meandering to our starting-point, with an exhibition by Jacqueline Mesmaeker in the true spirit of the Belgian master – sophisticated and subversive in equal measure.

Jacqueline Mesmaeker, exhibition view, La Verrière, Brussels, 2019
Courtesy of the artist © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Secret Outlines, Versailles, 1998, dessins au crayon, 15,5 x 200 cm
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Fouquet en cascade, 2017, lettrage adhésif, 480 x 280 cm
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Introductions Roses, 1995-2019, sergé de coton teinté, dimensions variables

Since the mid-Seventies, following her early career in fashion, architecture and design, Jacqueline Mesmaeker has forged an understated, highly original body of work combining installation, drawing, film, sculpture, photography and artist’s books. Based on experimental protocols exploring figuration and looking, Mesmaeker’s analytical approach is expressed in forms rooted in the world of literature and poetry, incorporating references to Lewis Carroll, Mallarmé, Herman Melville and Paul Willems. Her rarefied, precise work is minimal, sometimes to the brink of non-existence, but proliferative nonetheless, taking possession of the available space and playing with its real and symbolic architecture to reveal its structures, force lines and fault-lines, subverting perspectives or correcting them with the lightest of touches. From pink fabric marking the interstices of a domestic setting to an impenetrable glasshouse that serves as a support for the projection of films, microscopic drawings springing from the irregularities in the surface of a wall, and multi-screen cinematic experiences presenting a football match or Images of birds in flight, Jacqueline Mesmaeker’s work effects surreptitious, clandestine interventions in the real world, based on close attention to detail and imperceptible situations and occurrences, operating on a sliding scale of visibility and invisibility. Here, the essence of the work eludes our gaze : a model boat is encased in metal girders, a candelabrum is set within a concrete column, and visible only by gamma-rays. This practice of concealment tests art’s capacity to exist beyond recognition or even consciousness, as if to shield the idea from the viewer’s gaze, to set it apart, an impulse driven more by a kind of exotism than by an unwillingness to cooperate. The same impalpability suffuses Mesmaeker’s oeuvre as a whole, as if the work were somehow unavailable, unable to be grasped or understood and, to that end, never fixed or finite, but evolving over time like a mutant virus, adapting to the inspiration of each new setting, and to the whims and desires of the moment.


Purse, 18th century. Collection J. Mesmaeker © Olivier Mignon and Jacqueline Mesmaeker

Erudite but non-academic, Jacqueline Mesmaeker’s work draws on the grand themes of the history of Western art : painting, figuration, historical subjects, nature, landscape, the frame, light etc. But as with Marcel Broodthaers, this appetite for classicism, and with it an element of pomp and circumstance, is continually distanced by a gentle, unspoken irony that lurks just beneath the surface – a critical mischievousness that allows the everyday and trivial to permeate the cracks in the edifice of classical solemnity.
We forget that the display of nobility or bourgeois appurtenance is – obviously – just that : a display, a dissemblance that in no way precludes magic or the desire to intervene, in fact quite the opposite. If the gold in Jacqueline Mesmaeker’s work is gilt bronze, if a painting is in fact a printed image, if her fireflies are photocopies, it is simply to echo the fakery woven into the fabric of our values and tastes.
Behind these humourous slippages, however, there lurks an anxiety and a melancholy, detectable in Mesmaeker’s recurrent motifs of rain, storms and catastrophes. This latent sense of tragedy is expressed most particularly in the shipwreck, a literary rather than painterly motif, retraceable to Edgar Allen Poe and his Manuscript Found in a Bottle (1833), or the Symbolist Stéphane Mallarmé and his poem Un coup de dès n’abolira jamais le hazard (1914), which deals similarly in storms, spray, the lapping of waves, whirlpools and accidental occurrences. In Mesmaeker’s work, the motif is given a literal treatment in L’Androgyne, an installation composed of two images (the sky and the sea), each lit by lights placed at either end of a length of flail and entitled ‘plane on the approach’ or ‘ship in distress’ ; the image of the shipwreck also permeates her work as a whole.

Jacqueline Mesmaeker, exhibition view, La Verrière, Brussels, 2019
Courtesy of the artist © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Fouquet en cascade, 2017, lettrage adhésif, 480 x 280 cm

The exhibition devised by Mesmaeker for La Verrière is a free composition of existing works and new, specially- created pieces inspired by the space’s unique identity and topography. The focal point of the project is a set of black-and-white landscape photographs – silhouettes of trees captured between land and sky, with an accompanying inscription on the mount : ‘Versailles prior to its construction’. Playing on the invocatory power of naming, on memory, and on visualisation and depiction in the mind’s eye, this realist image is a paradoxical form of trompe l’oeil that conceals its anachronistic nature at a passing glance, and appeals to a false sense of nostalgia, repeated in a facing mirror entitled ‘Versailles after its destruction’. Epitomised by Versailles, French-style gardens are known for their rigorous, geometric, symmetrical dissection of space as an expression of an authoritarian urge to tame wild nature. Like scientific perspective, of which French-style gardens are a legacy, Versailles is the embodiment of a veritable ‘politics of looking’. Jacqueline Mesmaeker counters this absolutism of the ideal with dissonant touches that play on shifts of perception, copying, and inflections of the hand and thought.
Fabric purses under glass in vitrines, discreetly annotated books, cascades of words on walls, a magically petrified pear : subtle punctuations that function less as a redaction of the institution of monarchy than as an invisible subtext whose scattered scraps seem to drift afloat on the surface of things ; confused signs that take on whatever meanings we as viewers may project in our efforts to discern some logic or method. What emerges is a meditation on landscape, its structures and making, in the form of a treasure-trail, a series of riddles and clues. It is just this form of generous hermetism that we seek in Jacqueline Mesmaeker’s world, this art of pointing to a sense of otherness, an imaginative Elsewhere despite – or as a result of – the formal rigour of her work.
Our season has been ballistic in name only, perhaps. As I noted in my introduction, it has evolved along oblique and sinuous paths, and as such, it has been made in the image of Jacqueline Mesmaeker’s own rarefied and precious trajectory : its impact is deliberately more furtive than direct, yet it cannot fail to hit its aim, given that it has never had any such thing.

Guillaume Désanges

Jacqueline Mesmaeker, exhibition view, La Verrière, Brussels, 2019
Courtesy of the artist © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Bourses de ceinture (details), 2018, soie et velours, 20 x 6 cm chacune


FRANÇAIS

JACQUELINE MESMAEKER

EXPOSITION DU 1er FÉVRIER AU 30 MARS 2019

VERNISSAGE JEUDI 31 JANVIER 2019, DE 18H À 21H

LA VERRIÈRE, BRUXELLES
50, BOULEVARD DE WATERLOO
DU MARDI AU SAMEDI, 12H-18H
ENTRÉE LIBRE

Un cycle d’expositions est un parcours, une aventure qui démarre sans que l’on sache exactement sur quel territoire elle finira. Lorsque j’ai commencé “Poésie balistique” en 2016, je l’avais placé sous l’égide de Marcel Broodthaers, autrement dit sous le régime d’un art dit conceptuel qui n’avait pas renoncé à la poésie, à cette part incompressible de la création qui échappe au programme et à la raison. Au moment de s’achever, ce cycle, comme un serpent lové sur lui-même, revient sur ses prémices après bien des détours, et se termine avec Jacqueline Mesmaeker dans un esprit aussi raffiné que subversif, à l’instar de celui du maître belge.

Vue de l’exposition de Jacqueline Mesmaeker, La Verrière, Bruxelles, 2019
Courtesy de l’artiste © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Introductions Roses, 1995-2019, sergé de coton teinté, dimensions variables

Depuis le milieu des années 1970, après des débuts dans la mode, l’architecture et le design, Jacqueline Mesmaeker développe une œuvre aussi discrète qu’originale, mêlant installations, dessins, films, sculptures, photographies et éditions. Partant d’intentions analytiques et de protocoles expérimentaux liés au regard et à la représentation, ses formes restent ancrées dans un univers littéraire et poétique, incluant des références à Lewis Carroll, Mallarmé, Melville ou Paul Willems. Minimal, parfois proche de la disparition, ce travail rare et précis n’en est pas moins proliférant. Il s’empare volontiers de l’espace, jouant avec l’architecture réelle et symbolique dont il révèle les structures et les lignes de force, mais aussi les failles, en déjoue les perspectives ou vient les corriger par touches délicates. Du tissu rose soulignant les interstices d’un lieu domestique jusqu’à une serre impénétrable support de projection de films, des dessins microscopiques à partir des anfractuosités des murs jusqu’à des dispositifs de cinéma multi-écrans présentant des plans d’oiseaux en vol ou une partie de football : c’est à partir d’une attention portée aux détails, aux incidents et aux situations imperceptibles que l’œuvre de Jacqueline Mesmaeker s’insère dans le réel de manière subreptice et clandestine, opérant à différentes échelles de visibilité et d’invisibilité. Car l’essentiel ici se dérobe au regard : une maquette de bateau enserrée dans des poutres en métal, un candélabre coulé dans une colonne de béton, et donc uniquement visibles par rayon gamma. Cette pratique de l’esquive éprouve la capacité de l’art à exister en dehors d’une reconnaissance ou même d’une conscience, comme s’il s’agissait de préserver l’idée à l’écart du regard, par une sorte d’exotisme de la sensibilité plus que par perversion. À l’échelle de tout l’œuvre, on note le même caractère insaisissable. Comme si le travail n’était jamais à prendre ni à comprendre, et pour ce faire, jamais fixé, mais se déployait dans le temps comme un virus mutant, se modifiant au gré des inspirations des lieux et des désirs du moment.

Vue de l’exposition de Jacqueline Mesmaeker, La Verrière, Bruxelles, 2019
Courtesy de l’artiste © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Versailles avant sa construction, 1981, photographie noir et blanc, encadrement, cartel, 70 x 83 cm

Érudit sans être doctoral, le travail de Jacqueline Mesmaeker puise aux grands motifs de l’histoire de l’art occidental : la peinture, la figuration, l’histoire, la nature, le paysage, le cadre, la lumière, etc. Mais cette appétence pour le classicisme, y compris une certaine pompe, est sans cesse mise à distance, comme chez Marcel Broodthaers, par une ironie douce qui ne dit pas son nom et affleure à la surface des choses. On pourrait parler ici d’une sorte d’espièglerie critique, laissant percer l’ordinaire et le trivial dans les interstices d’une certaine solennité classique. Évidence oubliée : l’apparat noble ou bourgeois n’est, quoi qu’il arrive, qu’un apparat, c’est-à-dire un jeu de dupes, qui n’empêche ni la magie, ni le désir d’opérer, bien au contraire. Chez Jacqueline Mesmaeker, si l’or n’est que du bronze doré, si la peinture n’est qu’une image imprimée, si les lucioles sont des photocopies, c’est en écho aux faux-semblants qui tissent la trame de nos valeurs et de nos goûts.

Vue de l’exposition de Jacqueline Mesmaeker, La Verrière, Bruxelles, 2019
Courtesy de l’artiste © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Versailles en cascade (détail), 2017, lettrage adhésif, 550 x 280 cm

Derrière ces glissements humoristiques pointe néanmoins une forme d’inquiétude ou de mélancolie, dont on pourra déceler la trace dans la récurrence de motifs comme la pluie, la tempête ou la catastrophe. Plus précisément, c’est le naufrage, motif plus littéraire que pictural, qui concentre cette tragédie latente, dont la source serait à chercher du côté d’Edgar Allan Poe et de son Manuscrit trouvé dans une bouteille (1833) ou encore chez Stéphane Mallarmé et son Coup de dés jamais n’abolira le hasard (1914) où il est également question de tempête, d’écume, de clapotis, de tourbillon et d’accident. Chez Jacqueline Mesmaeker, le motif se retrouve littéralement dans L’Androgyne, installation composée de deux images (le ciel et la mer), chacune éclairée par un système de lampes à l’extrémité d’un axe en “fléau”, nommées “avion en phase d’approche” et “navire en détresse”, mais imprègne plus largement l’œuvre.

Vue de l’exposition de Jacqueline Mesmaeker, La Verrière, Bruxelles, 2019
Courtesy de l’artiste © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Versailles après sa destruction (détail), 2018, transfert sur miroir, 63,5 x 40,5 cm

L’exposition imaginée par l’artiste pour La Verrière est une libre composition d’œuvres existantes et de productions spécifiques, inspirée par le lieu, son identité et sa topographie. L’œuvre autour de laquelle s’articule le projet est la photographie noir et blanc d’un paysage, silhouettes d’arbres entre ciel et terre, accompagnée d’une mention imprimée sur le passe-partout : “Versailles avant sa construction”. Jouant sur la puissance évocatrice de la nomination, sur le souvenir et la représentation mentale, cette image réaliste est paradoxalement une forme de trompe l’œil qui, observée rapidement, dissimule son anachronisme et en appelle à une nostalgie factice, dont le rappel se fait par le biais d’un miroir en regard évoquant “Versailles après sa destruction”. On sait comment le jardin à la française, dont Versailles est l’emblème, consiste en un découpage rigoureusement géométrique et symétrique de l’espace, qui est une manière autoritaire de dompter la nature et représente, tout comme la perspective dont il est l’héritier, une véritable politique du regard. À cet absolutisme idéal, Jacqueline Mesmaeker oppose des touches dissonantes jouant sur le décalage, la copie, les inflexions de la main et de la pensée. Des bourses en tissu sous vitrine, des livrets discrètement annotés, des cascades de mots sur les murs ou une poire magiquement pétrifiée : autant de ponctuations subtiles qui fonctionnent moins comme un caviardage de l’institution monarchique que comme un sous-texte invisible, dont des bribes éparses flotteraient à la surface des choses. Des signes troubles qui se chargent de sens selon ce que le regardeur y projette en cherchant à y déceler une logique. S’y dessine une réflexion sur le paysage et sa construction, sous la forme du jeu de piste et de l’énigme. C’est précisément cette forme généreuse d’hermétisme que nous venons chercher dans l’univers de Jacqueline Mesmaeker, cet art de désigner un ailleurs de la sensibilité malgré ou justement par la rigueur des formes.
Si ce cycle n’aura peut-être eu de balistique que le nom, puisque comme on l’a dit en introduction son développement a été oblique et sinueux, c’est certainement à l’image de la trajectoire rare et précieuse de Jacqueline Mesmaeker : une stratégie d’impact plus furtive que directe, qui ne peut toutefois pas manquer sa cible, étant donné qu’elle n’en a pas.

Guillaume Désanges

Vue de l’exposition de Jacqueline Mesmaeker, La Verrière, Bruxelles, 2019
Courtesy de l’artiste © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Secret Outlines, Versailles (détail), 1998, dessins au crayon, 15,5 x 200 cm

Vue de l’exposition de Jacqueline Mesmaeker, La Verrière, Bruxelles, 2019
Courtesy de l’artiste © Isabelle Arthuis / Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Jacqueline Mesmaeker, Introductions Roses (détail), 1995-2019, sergé de coton teinté, dimensions variables


Press Release

PDF - 938.7 ko

Dossier de presse

PDF - 942.3 ko

Feuille de salle

PDF - 28.8 ko