Shows / Expositions  | Projects / projets  | La Verrière, Bruxelles  | Méthode Room, Chicago  | Workshop / Ateliers  | Texts / Textes  | Interviews / Entretiens  | INFO




>> La Verrière, Bruxelles

Isabelle Cornaro
La Verrière / Fondation Hermès, Brussels, 2016



>> EXPOSITION ISABELLE CORNARO
à La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Bruxelles
du 15.01.2016 au 26.03.2016

VF disponible en bas de page

Isabelle Cornaro has enjoyed a growing presence on the international contemporary art scene over the past decade. Cornaro is one of a generation of artists drawing on precise knowledge and research, while at the same time pursuing a very practical commitment to the plastic formalisation of that erudition, in their work. Cornaro’s work reflects her continuing exploration of artistic representation in the Classical period (notably the history of architectural perspective and garden design), actualised in a variety of media : drawings, film, photography, sculpture. Her work seeks to lay bare the structures underpinning Classical representation (proportion, compositional grids, vanishing points), by re-casting them in geometrically-partitioned systems of her own, incorporating objects, images and human figures.

Meticulously executed yet enigmatic and deliberately resistant to categorisation, Cornaro’s practice is broadly definable as collage, incorporating bold aesthetic, historical and conceptual associations. Her sources combine erudite iconography (landscape paintings, photographs of modern architecture, still lifes) and popular culture (domestic design, cheap trinkets, kitsch decorations). Drawing on these, her work pushes at the frontiers of traditional artistic disciplines and categories, often passing from one medium or dimension to another within the same series, refuting the notion of specific supports as the unchanging preserve of specific representational forms. Cornaro treats sculpture like painting (laying bare its relationship to layout and composition, framing and colour) and painting like sculpture (emphasizing the work’s relationship to its spatial setting, and the physicality and shifting perspective of the viewer) – a strategy ideally suited to her sophisticated meditation on art and the history of art.
By their very nature, her unerringly precise, structured forms blur the relationships between abstraction and figuration, nature and representation, reality and illusion. A two-dimensional landscape projection is perceived less as a plan, and more as a story-board [1] ; a volume is photographed and flattened in the process [2] ; an abstract arrangement of family jewellery recreates the underlying structure of an African landscape [3] ; more recently, objects and materials are arranged with meticulous precision on narrow, coloured stands. [4]
Elsewhere, the Sans-Souci [5] series plays on juxtapositions of heterogeneous forms : a geometric structure made of paper folds (again derived from the transposition of existing scenes or landscapes), in which strands of horsehair are entwined like figurative motifs.
Cornaro’s work operates within a gently contradictory regime, actively questioning the paradoxes and blind alleys of traditional representation, actualised through the experience of modern movements and media from Minimalism to cinema.

For her exhibition at La Verrière, Isabelle Cornaro has produced a new work conceived as a kind of sculptural precipitate of her experiments with colour, perspective and volume, resonating with the venue’s topography and her current artistic preoccupations.
Beneath La Verrière’s glass roof, the exhibition’s central structure is part mausoleum, part minimalist sculpture and functional ‘vanity’, in the tradition of 18th-century architectural follies. But the Hard-edge aesthetic of its radical, geometric form is undermined by the motif that covers its surface. The spray-painted design uses pointillism, soft shading and kitsch decoration to conceal the volume’s sharp edges and flatten its austere form while at the same conferring a curious aesthetic appeal. Created in situ, the installation is potent with the traces of its own making. The piece plays on the ambivalence of the venue as a showcase and studio alike. It is exhibitionist and withdrawn in equal measure. As often in Cornaro’s work, however, the piece’s superficially ‘cold’ aspect masks a seductive appeal that is simultaneously rejected and playfully exploited. This fundamental ambiguity plays on the viewer’s constantly shifting affects, taste and aesthetic enjoyment of the piece, as we move around the space. This unresolved quality might be seen as one of the work’s weaknesses but in reality, it is the key to its power : the power of an analytical work with an undeniably sensual, mysterious aura, a work that accuses and challenges the politics of looking as shaped by the history of representation, by ultimately revealing itself to be more cruel than rational, more trenchant than precise, more perverse than seductive.

At a more profound level, the disturbing, ambivalent charm of Isabelle Cornaro’s works lies in the tension between their appearance of conceptual rigor, and the intimate narratives and urgent tensions that underpin and break through their formal surface. The simplest lines whisper stories, the most desolate landscapes are resonant with individual destinies, ordinary objects display a fetishistic engagement with their own materials. By engaging with the history of architectural and pictorial representation, Cornaro’s works are not merely demonstrations. Rather, they strive to create affective genealogies – an approach that functions like a kind of archaeology in reverse, working with the fossil record, fixing sedimentary layers of objects and images beneath single colours. But beneath these fascinating historical connections, an alternative network of subversive links is forged – between corruption and perfection, classical rigor and baroque fervour, the mind and the body – as if lifting the veil on some cursed portion of the rationalist ideal. Cornaro’s work hints at a discreet, ideological critique – suggested rather than overtly figured – denouncing the subjection of the individual viewer’s gaze to the rules of representation, the body to the architectural master-plan, and the object to the economy of its own production. Because distance is everything in Isabelle Cornaro’s work. From historical perspectives to optical tools, the interstices between successive perspectival planes, and ‘disappeared’ objects, everything is there before us yet nothing is immediately palpable : an approach that sees the artwork as a form of melancholy, if we agree to the latter as a form of unobjectified yearning

[1] - Black Maria, 2008.
[2] - Cinesculpture, 2008.
[3] - Savane autour de Bangui et
le fleuve Utubangui, 2003-2007.
[4] - Témoins Oculaires, Spike
Island, scene 4, 2015.
[5] - Sans-Souci, 2005-2007.




Newspaper of the exhibition / Journal de l’exposition

PDF - 983.2 ko

>> EXPOSITION ISABELLE CORNARO
à La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Bruxelles
du 15.01.2016 au 26.03.2016

Présente de manière croissante sur la scène internationale de l’art depuis une dizaine d’années, Isabelle Cornaro fait partie d’une génération d’artistes aussi précisément nourrie de savoir et de connaissance que concrètement engagée dans les formalisations plastiques de son érudition. Son œuvre manifeste une préoccupation constante pour les enjeux de la représentation à l’âge classique, notamment l’histoire de la perspective architecturale ou l’art des jardins, qu’elle actualise via différentes techniques : dessin, film, photographie, sculpture.
Elle s’attache à dévoiler les structures fondamentales de ces représentations (proportions, grilles de compositions, lignes de fuite), en les reportant dans un système de partition géométrique à l’intérieur duquel elle réintègre des objets, des images ou la figure humaine.
Son travail à la facture soignée, mais dont les codifications restent volontairement énigmatiques, relève d’une pratique générale de collage et d’associations audacieuses, en termes à la fois esthétique, historique et conceptuel. Les sources mélangent iconographie savante (tableaux de paysages, photographies d’architectures modernes, natures mortes) et culture populaire (design domestique, pacotille, décorations kitsch). À partir de celles-ci, l’œuvre conteste les frontières entre les catégories admises de l’art, passant d’un médium ou d’une dimension à l’autre au sein du même programme, en contestant l’idée selon laquelle il existerait un support réservé à un type de représentation. Traiter la sculpture comme de la peinture (en dévoilant ses rapports au plan, à la composition, au cadrage et à la couleur), traiter la peinture comme de la sculpture (en soulignant son rapport à l’espace, aux perspectives changeantes et au corps du regardeur) sont des stratégies qu’elle adopte en produisant une fine réflexion sur l’art et son histoire. Les relations entre abstraction et figuration, entre la nature et sa représentation, ainsi qu’entre le réel et l’illusion sont volontairement brouillées, dans l’implacable précision même des formes qu’elle construit.
Ainsi la projection en deux dimensions d’un paysage n’est-elle pas forcément un plan, mais peut revêtir la forme d’un story-board [1] , d’un volume aplati par la photographie [2] , d’une composition abstraite de bijoux familiaux reprenant quelques éléments structurants d’un paysage africain [3] ou plus récemment des objets et matières précisément disposés sur
d’étroits présentoirs colorés [4] . Ailleurs, la série des Sans-Souci [5] joue sur une juxtaposition de formes hétérogènes : une structure géométrique faite de pliures de papier (toujours dérivées de transposition de scènes ou de paysages existants) dans laquelle sont entremêlées des mèches de cheveux utilisées comme éléments figuratifs. Le travail opère sur un régime de la contradiction douce, interrogeant en actes quelques paradoxes et impasses de la représentation traditionnelle, actualisés par les acquis d’une modernité artistique qui va de l’art minimal au cinéma. Pour son exposition à La Verrière, Isabelle Cornaro a imaginé une nouvelle production en écho avec la topographie du lieu et ses préoccupations actuelles, qui tendent vers des précipités sculpturaux de ses recherches autour de la couleur, de la perspective et du volume. Une structure centrale prend place sous La Verrière, entre mausolée, sculpture minimale et vanité fonctionnelle dans la tradition des « folies » architecturales du xviii e siècle. Mais sa forme extérieure radicale, à tendance géométrique hard edge, est mise en doute par le motif même qui la recouvre. Réalisé à la bombe, entre pointillisme, dégradé et ornement kitsch, il fait disparaître les arêtes du volume, aplanit son austérité formelle, tout en lui concédant une étrangeté esthétique. Réalisée dans l’espace d’exposition, l’installation présente potentiellement les traces de sa fabrication, jouant sur une ambiguïté entre la vitrine et l’atelier, entre exhibition et autisme. Dans tous les cas, comme souvent chez l’artiste, sous une apparente froideur, il y a une séduction qu’elle rejette en même temps qu’elle en joue. Une ambiguïté fondamentale, qui se joue des recadrages permanents de nos affects, de la mobilité oscillante de notre goût et de nos plaisirs esthétiques, selon le point de vue qu’on adopte. Cette position irrésolue pourrait apparaître comme une faiblesse du travail : elle est sa force même. Celle d’une œuvre analytique qui ne refuse ni l’aura, ni la sensualité, ni le mystère. Une œuvre qui dénonce et conteste les politiques du regard forgées par l’histoire de la représentation, en se révélant finalement plus cruelle que rationnelle, plus tranchante que précise, plus perverse que séduisante.
Plus profondément, ce qui fonde le trouble charme des œuvres d’Isabelle Cornaro, c’est que leur apparente rigueur conceptuelle est infusée d’histoires secrètes, de récits personnels et de tensions désirantes qui percent la surface formelle des choses. Les lignes les plus simples murmurent des histoires, les paysages les plus désolés résonnent de destins individuels et les objets ordinaires de relations fétichistes à la matière. En abordant l’histoire de l’architecture et de la représentation picturale, ses œuvres ne sombrent donc pas dans la démonstration mais s’attachent à créer des généalogies affectives. Une démarche qui relève d’une forme d’archéologie à l’envers, travaillant des traces fossiles, fixant des couches sédimentaires d’objets et d’images sous des unités chromatiques. Mais sous ces passionnants rapports historiques se tissent d’autres liens, souterrains, entre perfection et corruption, entre rigueur classique et fièvre baroque, entre l’esprit et le corps, qui dévoilent comme une part maudite de l’idéal rationaliste. L’œuvre ouvre alors une discrète perspective critique, voire idéologique (soumission des regards aux règles de la représentation, des corps à la planification architecturale et de l’objet à son économie de production), qui reste suggérée plutôt que figurée. Car chez Isabelle Cornaro, tout est de l’ordre de la distance. Des perspectives historiques aux outils optiques, des intervalles de plans successifs aux objets disparus, tout est là mais rien n’est réellement immédiat. Une position qui pourrait apparenter le travail à une forme de mélancolie si tant est que l’on considère celle-ci comme une forme de désir sans objet.

[1] - Black Maria, 2008.
[2] - Cinesculpture, 2008.
[3] - Savane autour de Bangui et
le fleuve Utubangui, 2003-2007.
[4] - Témoins Oculaires, Spike
Island, scene 4, 2015.
[5] - Sans-Souci, 2005-2007.

Courtesy : Isabelle Cornaro
Crédit photograhies : Isabelle Arthuis