Shows / Expositions  | Projects / projets  | La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Bruxelles  | Méthode Room, Chicago  | Workshop / Ateliers  | Texts / Textes  | Interviews / Entretiens  | INFO




>> La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Bruxelles

Nil Yalter 1973/2015
La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015



Nil Yalter 1973/2015
from 02 october to 05 december 2015

Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis

Continuing the ‘Gesture, and thought’ season initiated in 2013, La Verriere presents Nil Yalter’s first solo exhibition in Belgium. Born in Egypt to a Turkish family, and based in Paris since 1965, Nil Yalter is a pioneering, freethinking,highly original artist pursuing her own aims and intuitions, fuelled by her strong commitment to social and political activism. The result is a hybrid oeuvre combining painting, drawing, photography, video and collage, with performance and installation. Taking an essentially conceptual approach (but relinquishing neither form nor materiality) Nil Yalter’s singular body of work has evaded the artistic canons and prescriptions of her day. The abstract paintings of her early career played a pivotal ’documentary’ role in the 1970s, exploring a blend of social, anthropological, and ethnographic issues and seeking to re-actualise the vernacular motifs of her native Turkish culture (artisanship, shamanism, magic and more) through their association with the foremost ideological issues and debates of the post-1968 era. For the current exhibition, Yalter has chosen to present an ensemble of works exploring nomadism and exile, from the iconic Topak Ev of 1973 to a new work created especially for the show, in 2015. At the heart of the show, Topak Ev is an historic masterpiece, its form borrowed from the ancestral traditions of the Anotalian nomads. The piece represents the circular ‘women’s tent’, revisited by Yalter both technically (a metal structure replaces the usual wood, and industrial felt is used in place of the nomads’ handmade wool felt) and in ideological terms. The tent becomes a feministbmanifesto, and a reflection on contemporary forms of exile. As a counterpoint to this work, Orient Express (1976) is the story of a journey made by the artist across central and eastern Europe, told in film, texts and drawings. Nil Yalter’s art is based entirely on experience, and on her emotional, physical connection to knowledge, forging subtle links between the body and mind, between forms and ideas, and between reality, the world of the imagination, and her faith in material things as receptacles for the markers of individual destinies. As such, Yalter’s installations testify to a kind of concrete idealism, imbued in materials, objects and the most everyday, man-made items. Rooted in the act of recycling, or the reactivation of existing materials and imagery, Nil Yalter’s art builds bridges between animism, spirituality and the great questions of modern art, as a perfect demonstration of how an intense commitment to the world of ideas can nonetheless remain indissociable from a commitment to form. Yalter’s works affirm that ideological resistance is achieved at the expense of poetry, through a kind of lust in action.


Drawings and collages for / Collages de dessins pour TOPAK EV, 1973

MATERIAL EVIDENCE

In this sense Yalter, a self-taught artist, is a fringe figure in relation to the conceptual art movement, renouncing neither form nor the literary qualities of art as a way of ‘speaking the world’. Indeed, the two are inextricable : the concrete materiality of Yalter’s work (collected, described, drawn or reproduced) functions as ‘proof’ or ‘evidence’ – testimony of a real situation to be scrutinized and assessed in forensic detail, in pursuit of its essential truth. (We should note that the word ‘forensic’ derives from the Latin forum and means, literally, ‘open to public scrutiny and discussion’.1 In this context, Yalter’s ‘artistic conviction’ takes on interesting nuances of meaning.) Yalter is indeed an artist of ‘conviction’, conscious of the social and economic realities of her time, looking through, even puncturing the material surface of things. Far from delivering a neutral account of the things ‘reported’ (in every sense) in her work, she emerges as a committed activist for whom the process of making visible is a form of denunciation or accusation in itself.
Yalter’s work is rooted in her personal experience, but her commitment and activism extend beyond this. As social dissent becomes increasingly fragmented and focused on the immediate concerns of specific communities, rather than more universal causes, Nil Yalter bears witness to a globalised culture of total struggle, as attentive to the fine detail as it is to the bigger picture : resistance with a capital R, inalienable, not merely ‘resistance to…’, but absolute ‘resistance’ as a state of being which, far from excluding specific instances, welcomes them because the particular invariably speaks for a broader whole. And so the round tent stands for more than its specific, vernacular origins ; it represents the ‘globality’ of all women, all exiles, all minorities, even standing as a metaphor for the freedom to ‘circulate’ in a world where land is increasingly privatized.


Drawings and collages for / Collages de dessins pour TOPAK EV, 1973

ARTISTIC NOMADISM

Nil Yalter’s art is difficult to apprehend as a whole ; it continues, subtly, to evade our grasp because it eludes every attempt at conclusive, stylistic labelling. Yalter engages in a process of continuous re-actualisation of her forms and statements, re-appropriating the knowledge and technologies of the day (like the marginalised ‘witches’ of old) to establish her own autonomous, independent régime in opposition to the prevailing hegemony. She has developed her practice outwith the concerns and demands of the market, forcing the establishment of her own ‘economy’, at once practical, aesthetic and ethical. As a result, few other oeuvres appear so perfectly attuned to their subject matter. Nil Yalter explores nomadism in her work. On the map of the professional art world, her path charts a life of active, fertile transhumance. Strange, moving, and speculative, Yalter’s work never settles, never capitalizes on her discoveries in the territories she explores. Instead, her sinuous ‘desire paths’ follow the spiralling, chaotic currents of the real world. Nil Yalter is a voluntary exile from her native culture, and an exile, too, in the land of art. The infinite freedom she espouses for others is first and foremost the freedom she has espoused herself, at every stage of her unique career.

1-See (in French) ‘Notes sur les pratiques forensiques‘, by Eyal Weizman, compiled and edited by Diane Dufour, in Images à charge, la construction de la preuve par l’image, Le Bal-Éditions Xavier Barral, 2015.

Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis

Dans le cadre du cycle « Des Gestes de la pensée » initié en 2103, La Verrière présente la première exposition personnelle de Nil Ya lter en Belgique. D’origine turque, née en Egypte, installée à Paris dès 1965, elle restera tout au long de sa carrière une artiste pionnière, libre et originale, qui suivra ses désirs et ses intuitions propres, nourris de convictions sociales et politiques, pour créer une œuvre hybride, mêlant la peinture, le dessin, la photographie, la vidéo, le collage, mais aussi la performance et l’installation. Fondé sur des bases conceptuelles, mais ne renonçant pas à la forme ni aux matières, le travail singulier de Nil Yalter a échappé aux canons et prescriptions de l’art de son temps. L’œuvre picturale et abstraite qui caractérise ses débuts opère un tournant « documentaire » dans les années 1970 : s’y mêlent alors des considérations sociales, anthropologiques et ethnographiques qui actualisent des motifs vernaculaires de son pays d’origine (dont l’artisanat, le chamanisme, la magie) en les associant aux enjeux idéologiques marquant l’après 1968.
Pour cette exposition, l’artiste a choisi de montrer un ensemble d’œuvres traitant de la question du nomadisme et de l’exil, qui vont de l’emblématique « Topak Ev » de 1973, jusqu’à une production de 2015 réalisée pour l’occasion. « Topak Ev », présentée au centre du dispositif, est une œuvre magistrale et historique, dont la forme est empruntée aux traditions ancestrales des nomades de l’Anatolie. Elle représente la tente « ronde » des femmes, que l’artiste renouvelle non seulement en termes techniques (le métal de la structure remplaçant le bois, le feutre industriel remplaçant le feutre artisanal), mais aussi en termes idéologiques, la transformant en manifeste féministe et réflexion sur les formes contemporaines de l’exil. En contrepoint à cette œuvre, « Orient Express » (1976) est le récit d’un voyage fait par l’artiste à travers l’Europe centrale et orientale sous forme de films, textes et dessins.
Tout l’art de Nil Yalter relève de l’expérience, c’est-à-dire d’une relation affective et physique à la connaissance, tissant des liens subtils entre le corps et l’esprit, les formes et les idées, la réalité et l’imaginaire, avec une foi dans les matières comme réceptacles des traces de destins individuels. Ce faisant, les installations de l’artiste manifestent une sorte d’idéalisme concret, qui imprègne les matériaux, les objets et les fabrications humaines parmi les plus ordinaires. Créant des ponts entre l’animisme, la spiritualité et les grandes questions de la modernité artistique, mais aussi entre les technologies contemporaines et l’artisanat, l’art de Nil Yalter, fondé sur le recyclage ou la réactivation de matériaux et d’images, montre bien comment l’intensité d’un engagement dans les idées est indissociable d’un engagement dans la forme, et affirme que la résistance idéologique se fait au risque de la poésie, par une sorte de sensualité en actes.


Drawings and collages for / Collages de dessins pour TOPAK EV, 1973


Pièces à conviction.

C’est dans cette perspective que l’artiste autodidacte appartient à une frange marginale de l’art conceptuel, qui ne renonce ni à la forme, ni aux vertus littéraires de l’art comme manière de « dire le monde ». De fait, ces deux exigences sont ici indissociables au sens où c’est la matière concrète (collectée, décrite, dessinée ou reproduite) qui opère comme « pièce à conviction ». Le terme « conviction » doit ici s’entendre dans tous ses sens. D’abord au sens juridique, comme un élément matériel « à charge », venant rendre compte d’une situation réelle, et qui doit être soumis à l’appréciation d’un regard. Une démarche qui renvoie à la notion de « forensique » (néologisme issu de l’anglais forensic), qui qualifie les méthodes d’analyse judiciaires ou légales de recherche de la vérité (recherches de preuves ou pièces à conviction), et qui étymologiquement vient du latin forum (« la place publique ; qui fait face au monde »), et donc relève du témoignage public et du partage d’expérience. Mais aussi c’est aussi, au sens métaphorique, la « conviction » d’une artiste consciente des réalités sociales et économiques de son époque qui transparaît et perce la surface matérielle des choses. Nil Yalter n’est en rien la comptable neutre des éléments qu’elle rapporte, mais bien plus un agent actif, engagé, qui dénonce par le fait même de rendre visible.

Bien que prenant appui sur son expérience personnelle, cet engagement dépasse par ailleurs le particularisme. Alors que la contestation sociale semble aujourd’hui atomisée, privilégiant l’échelle communautaire et immédiate à une universalité des constats, Nil Yalter est le témoin d’une culture de la lutte globalisée, totale, engagée dans le détail autant que dans l’ensemble : une résistance avec un grand R, intransitive, pas seulement une « résistance à » mais une résistance tout court, qui n’empêche nullement la convocation de situations spécifiques, bien au contraire, tant que le particulier parle au nom d’un ensemble plus large. Ainsi de la tente ronde qui, au-delà de son origine vernaculaire, représente la « sphère » de toutes les femmes, mais aussi de tous les exilés, de toutes les minorités, voire une métaphore de la liberté de circuler dans un monde où la terre est de plus en plus privatisée.


Drawings and collages for / Collages de dessins pour TOPAK EV, 1973

Nomadisme artistique

Si l’art de Nil Yalter est difficile à appréhender dans son ensemble, s’il reste discrètement insaisissable, c’est qu’il échappe à toute détermination stylistique. De fait, l’artiste n’a eu de cesse d’actualiser ses formes et son propos, en se rappropriant, comme la figure de la « sorcière » d’antan, les connaissances et les technologies de son époque, dans un régime d’autonomie et d’indépendance face aux pouvoirs dominants. Ayant développé sa pratique hors du marché, elle a du créer sa propre économie de travail, économie personnelle mais aussi esthétique et éthique. Dès lors, force est de constater qu’il y a peu d’œuvres qui battent au rythme même de leur sujet de façon si exemplaire. De la même manière que l’art de Nil Yalter traite du nomadisme, son parcours lui-même au sein d’une cartographie professionnelle de l’art prend des allures de transhumance active et d’errance féconde. Une œuvre mouvante, curieuse et spéculative, qui ne s’installe jamais ni ne capitalise ses découvertes au sein de territoires explorés, mais dessine des lignes sinueuses, désirantes, qui épousent les mouvements tournoyants et chaotiques du réel. Exilée volontaire de par ses origines, Nil Yalter l’est aussi bien au pays de l’art, et la liberté infinie qu’elle revendique pour les autres est d’abord celle qu’elle exerce à toutes les étapes de son parcours unique.


Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis


ORIENT-EXPRESS, 1976, courtesy Hubert Winter Gallery


Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis

Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis

Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis

Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis

Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis

RAHIME, Kurdish woman from Turkey / RAHIME, Femme Kurde de Turquie, 1979
Courtesy MOT International Gallery


Exhibition views, La Verrière - Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Brussels, 2015, © Isabelle Arthuis

+++ Download the exhibition newspaper / Télécharger le journal de l’exposition :

Zip - 933.5 ko

PRESS ARTICLES :
http://www.todayszaman.com/arts-culture_nil-yalters-1973-nomads-tent-on-display-in-brussels_402524.html